Category Archives: Financial Investment

Tips for Safe Investing During Volatile Times

Investment

The reality is that you are going to experience volatile markets at least once or twice if you hold your investments for any length of time. Volatility is something that every investors needs to deal with. Volatility does not have to mean big losses. Several tips will help you to invest safely when markets are experiencing volatility.

 

Assess Risk Carefully

Your investment decisions are exposing your portfolio to more risk when markets or governments are going through volatile periods. You need to assess the risk attached to every investment decision carefully. You are generally going to want to stick to larger stocks and investment vehicles that have a history showing they can weather the storm. If you do make a risky investment during volatile times, then be fully prepared to lose the money.

 

Have Patience

Volatile markets can move very fast. You want to avoid trying to time the market or micromanage every investment. You need to have patience to come out of volatile times without significant losses. Do not overreact to sudden spikes and dips unless they are clearly part of a larger trend. Having patience can allow your portfolio to survive and regain lost value over the course of months or years.

 

Keep Your Investments Diverse

The key to getting through volatile times is keeping your investments diverse. You might even need to rebalance your portfolio to make it more diverse. Diversity is important because volatile markets do not normally hit every sector, investment vehicle or company at the same time. Diversity allows your investments to minimize exposure to any single risk so that growth is still possible in unaffected areas.

 

Learn From Successful Investors

Many successful business people and investors have survived or thrived during volatile periods. You should take time to learn from these successful individuals. You will likely want to read some of the most recommended business books written by successful investors who have overcome volatile markets and turned a profit. The advice of these individuals and business owners can be invaluable for protecting your investments.

 

Try To Lower Costs and Fees

Your expected yields when the markets are volatile are likely to be average or a little below average. You will want to take steps to try to lower costs, fees and taxes during this time. Even a small amount of savings by taking advantage of tax laws or switching to an investment house with lower fees can save the small amount needed to keep the portfolio earning an acceptable yield.

 

2014-investment-projections

 

 

Stick To Your Goals

The worst thing you can do when markets become volatile is to panic. You do not want to abandon your long-term investment goals. You need to stick to your goals and keep them in mind when making investment decisions. Sticking to your original goals or plan will keep you focused on the long-term growth of investments and not on mitigating short-term uncertainty.

 

Venture Capital Fund Raising For Your Business or As a Firm

Venture Capital has become a booming business in the past few years. VC investing increased by about 31 percent in 2012. This might seem counter-intuitive, considering the skittish interest that investors have in the stock market. The answer might be that ordinary stock is unappealing, because established businesses are undergoing stagnation or downsizing. Investors might be hoping that emerging industries will fuel their desire for profit and growing assets.

There is plenty of money to be had, and many wealthy people are just holding onto their funds until they can find something better than slow bonds. If people think an asset is ready to grow, they are willing to take inordinate risks in rather shaky markets. Venture Capital is up because other investments seem less appealing.

This means opportunity, if you are a firm that specializes in venture capital fund raising. There are plenty of growing businesses that need cash to fuel their advancement, and plenty of of people with real cash that want the inside deal. A firm that can persuade both ends of business can end up with a lot of honest work.

A third party that offers fundraising as a service must know how to advertise an investment opportunity and how to hold a conference. They must make it seem like real information and not just a sales pitch. People are protective about their money, and do not want to feel like they are simply being sweet talked. Real facts and figures are key, as well as demonstrations of the end product.

For a firm that can show a successful track record, they will find ready customers both in start up companies and in folks wanting a slice of the action. Someone who can work both sides will garner good commissions and whatever other compensation becomes due. It is a rewarding career that serves a necessary purpose for emerging technologies and the entrepreneurs who are trying to put them on the market.

New companies can themselves seek venture capital, which might be the first step before a company can even get started. Closed stock that is sold to venture capitalists is often called seed funding. It is the money that goes into a business to get it started. Since it is not already operational, seed funding is considered more risky than investing in something that is already running and vigorously growing.

Interested to advanced venture capital topics? Read more from David Hand Crescent Point Singapore or visit Crescent Point Venture Capital news site, the leading emerging markets investment management and financial advisory firm primarily targeting in the Asia-Pacific and Middle East regions.

Howard Hartenbaum from August Capital discusses different types of funding sources, different types of investors and how to approach them, what VCs look for in companies, and his experiences from being an IT investor and entrepreneur.

Private Equity for Start-Up Businesses

Small businesses are often faced with problems that larger businesses do not face, the largest of which is typically maintaining cash flow to run operations as well as to expand. Cash flow can be generated from many different sources including cash from operations, debt financing, and equity financing. While all three make for reasonable ways to raise capital, cash from operations is often insufficient to fund growth to truly expand the business, while debt financing can restrictive covenants that can limit an organization’s ability to expand. Debt financing often has punitive interest rates for small startups which can limit their ability to succeed during the critical initial period of the business when cash flow is tight.

Equity financing is commonly used as a way to attractive capital for small startup companies. Equity financing can either be obtained on public markets (regulated market exchanges) or through private equity financing. Many organizations, particularly small start-ups, do not feel as if they have sufficient critical mass to effectively tap public markets due to the regulatory costs associated with public filings. As such, this leaves private equity as the most effective way for these organizations to obtain financing to run their business.

Private equity can be attracted from many different sources. Individual investors make up a source of private equity raises, but can be difficult to attract. In addition, blue sky laws which fluctuate from state to state may limit this as a source of equity for some companies who are attracting a large number of investors (typically over 500). Startups often turn to institutional investors as a way of raising equity that can be significantly higher in amount and therefore not subject to these possibly punitive blue sky laws.

The way in which private equity transactions can be structured may be varied and fluctuate in terms. Common stock shares are sometimes issued, but increasingly preferred shares are issued by small startups to investors that afford them the ability to convert these shares to common shares if the startup entity is successful, but provides them with the ability to maintain a higher liquidation preference if the organization is later liquidated. As a result, convertible preferred stock is often used in private equity deals with startup organizations, although many varieties exist.

Raising private equity can be challenging for small startups as they often do not have the earnings history of larger organizations. However, they provide the opportunity to grow significantly faster than more established businesses and offer a higher rate of return to reward shareholders.

Stay updated with more news of private equity issues from David Hand Crescent Point Asia or learn further info of Crescent Point Private Equity, the leading emerging markets investment management and financial advisory firm primarily targeting in the Asia-Pacific and Middle East regions.

This video gives the training for finance on how private equity works.